Hey Red Sox… sign Omar Vizquel

I am dead serious. Bring him on board. How much would he cost the Sox? $1 million? $2 million for one year?
The Red Sox have wisely stayed away from this year’s free agent class with the exception of Nick Punto who isn’t exactly a superstar. He’s there to give the Red Sox some infield depth.
But why not bring in Omar Vizquel as well?
One of the last remaining players from the 1980s is still floating out there. Why not tack on a 24th year to his career?
And what would his main purpose on the team be?
To start some games at short and help break in Jose Iglesias. What better mentor could the Red Sox shortstop of the future have than possibly the best defensive shortstop of all time?
And one who literally can say “I’ve been in the major leagues longer than you’ve been alive!”
Vizquel played 143 games in 1989.
Iglesias was born in January 1990.

Having Vizquel as depth and an unofficial coach could only help the Red Sox as they build towards 2013. $2 million to help develop the shortstop of the future is a bargain.

Compare that to the $44 million spent on Edgar Renteria and Julio Lugo.

And with 2,841 hits, the Red Sox can watch him creep slowly to 3,000.

Combine that with Tim Wakefield needing 6 wins to tie and 7 to pass Roger Clemens and Cy Young for most ever wins by a Red Sox pitcher, you could have two of the slowest and most painful build ups to a baseball milestone ever happening at the same time!

And seeing that I don’t think the Red Sox are winning squat in 2012, why not have THAT reason to go to the park?

Come on Sox! It’s not like he’s going to cost the Red Sox a draft pick or a long term deal. Bring him on board!

Besides, if he makes it to the Hall of Fame (which I think he will) then there will be another plaque with “Boston (A.L.)” on it. And that’s not bad.

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Does Omar Vizquel have 201 hits left in him?

Omar Vizquel is going to be 44 next season… and he has a contract to play for the White Sox.

He will be a mentor to the talented young infielders with Chicago. Gordon Beckham at second, Alexei Ramirez at short and Dayan Viciedo at third could be as talented a collection of infielders as you will see in the bigs… and each can learn a little from the master.

Vizquel will always be considered one of the great defensive shortstops in history. And a few years ago I made the case that he belongs in the Hall of Fame regardless of his offensive short comings. He was a good hitter, but his defense and the number of hits and runs he took away I felt put him over the top.

If he can get 201 more hits, that won’t be an issue.
He sits at 2,799 career hits. 201 more gives him 3,000 and the issue is closed. No using his 11 Gold Gloves as his resume highlight.

Obviously he isn’t going to get 201 in 2011 unless he suddenly becomes Ichiro.
But if he gets around 95 hits like he did this past season in Chicago, then it will almost be a foregone conclusion that he will play in 2012 and make a run at it.

He’s played 22 seasons already and if he got 10 more hits each of those years, he’d be past 3,000 already. This reminds me of the Harold Baines dilemma and how close HE came to 3,000 and Cooperstown. But unlike Baines, who by the end of his career didn’t need to OWN a glove, Vizquel remained the gold standard (literally) BECAUSE of his glove, adding to his trophy case as recently as 2006.

The only thing with more range than his defense is the time that Omar stretched across in baseball.

He was a rookie in 1989 with the Seattle Mariners. That was the same year that another rookie named Ken Griffey Jr. made the squad and a minor leaguer named Randy Johnson came over from Montreal. Could that team have had three Hall of Famers on the roster?

Hall of Famers such as George Brett, Nolan Ryan, Carlton Fisk, Robin Yount, Paul Molitor and Jim Rice were all still active when he broke in… as were names from another era like Fred Lynn, Dwight Evans, Dave Parker, Keith Hernandez, Chet Lemon and Tommy John.

He was a teammate with Ken Griffey Sr on the Mariners… and with Tim Lineccum, Matt Cain, Brian Wilson and Pablo Sandoval on the Giants… and with Josh Hamilton, Nelson Cruz, Neftali Feliz and C. J. Wilson on the Giants… connecting both 2010 World Series teams with the Big Red Machine.

And was as vital a part of the great Cleveland revival in 1995 as any of the (probably juiced up) sluggers.

He already has more hits than Ozzie Smith, the other standard of shortstop wizardry.

Stick around Omar. Stay in shape. (Clearly Vizquel wasn’t on the juice!) And get 201 more hits… then rehearse that Cooperstown speech.

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Is Omar Vizquel a Hall of Famer without a qualifier?

Last night Omar Vizquel drove in the go ahead run in a game where the White Sox would ultimately lose in extra innings to the Mariners.

I was watching the game and the graphic above caught my eye.

Omar Vizquel is tied for 50th on the all time hit list.

I had to rub my eyes for a second to make sure I didn’t see that incorrectly.

There have only been 49 people with more hits than Omar Vizquel in the history of the major leagues.

Only 2 players in the history of baseball who are eligible for the Hall of Fame have that many hits and are not in Cooperstown.

Vada Pinson and Harold Baines, who was Vizquel’s teammate in Cleveland and now is one of his coaches for the White Sox.

Now earlier I wrote about how if Harold Baines got 7 more hits in each of his seasons, he would have had over 3,000 hits and be in the Hall of Fame.

With 117 more hits, Omar Vizquel could pass Baines.

But Baines was a pure hitter. He was a DH for almost his entire career and even as a hitter, he very rarely was considered to be one of the elites.

Vizquel has been one of the elite shortstops for a generation.
He has the 11 Gold Gloves to prove it. When I wrote about who should be in the Hall of Fame in 2007 and 2009, I put Omar Vizquel on the edges saying in 2007:
“His Offensive numbers haven’t even come close, but has there been someone who has been such an overwhelming DEFENSIVE prescence as Vizquel for the past 17 seasons? That should count for something!”

And in 2009:
“His defense was so good he might make it in. It would be nice if he was more of a threat with the bat.”

Well if he can be listed among Hall of Fame names in the hit column with pure hitters, then maybe he belongs in!

And Luis Aparcio and Ozzie Smith and Bill Mazeroski are all in the Hall mainly for their gloves… and Vizquel has surpassed them in the hit column.

This is his 22nd season and his 4th decade in the bigs and can still pick the ball. And while his .276 average isn’t making Josh Hamilton nervous yet, it does show that he probably has a few more years left.

Maybe even 251 hits.

Either way, consider myself sold.

Omar Vizquel belongs in the Hall of Fame.

I say it and I stand by it.

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